'community'

Ruth Catlow -Time is speeding up

22nd October 2016 by michael
animation | architecture | arts | collaboration | community | conceptual | event | exhibition | experimental | happening | installation | new media art | process/systems | technology | video



Time is speeding up (2016, 11MB, 1:00 min)

This is a beautiful piece, a distillation down to a minute of a three month installation by Ruth Catlow, artist and co-director of the marvellous Furtherfield.
She explains its premise and construction better than I can, so I’ll hand over to her:

This networked video performance and installation is about how life seems to speed up as we get older; based on the reflection that when I was one day old, a day was my whole life but on the second day one day was only half my life etc.
The work was commissioned for ‘We Are Not Alone’, an exhibition for 20-21 Visual Arts Centre, Scunthorpe, UK.
During exhibition opening hours between 23rd January -24th April 2016, viewers could watch a live looping video online. At the exhibition people could pose for the web cam, or might be caught looking at the video in which they were soon to be portrayed.
Using a computer programme called Geological Time Piece that I created with Gareth Foote a still webcam image was captured every 3-5 minutes during exhibition opening hours. The camera pointed at a wall in the gallery, upon which a changing text was displayed. The software added each image as a frame to a looping video, of fixed 3 minute duration. The frame density increased every 3 minutes, as each images was added to the video.
In the exhibition space full of movement – of light and shade and people coming and going – people could insert themselves into the video by standing between the webcam and the text. Over three months the human presences started to flicker and disappear and the moving image progressively conveyed a more geological sense of time, the arc of daylight moving through the space, the architecture, and other more static things came to dominate the image. The computer programme stopped running when the exhibition closed by which time the video contained over 3600 images. The final video runs for a minute at 60fps.


Lior Shvil – In Whatever Time

1st November 2013 by doron
advertising | arts | bliss | community | conceptual | documentary arts | humor | participatory | politics


inwhatevertime
In Whatever Time (2010, 290MB, 15 min.)

“…Occupying a space somewhere between storytelling and spectacle, TV shows and
advertisements, the video and sculpture installations of such invented personas as
Cherry Bomb Fluffy White and Charley OnOff address the fragmented
representations of politics and gender, autobiography and history in contemporary
society. Embracing the roles of director, actor, narrator, editor, and set designer,
his experiments in epic theatrical production explore the comic territory of the jester
as he flirts with cultural stereotypes and satirizes political ideologies.”
Lior Shvil.


Lior Shvil – The Kosher Butcher

29th October 2013 by doron
activism | arts | community | conceptual | documentary arts | humor | participatory | performance | politics | video


The Kosher Butcher
The Kosher Butcher (2010, 84MB, 8:56 min.)

“.. Israeli provocateur Lior Shvil presented “The Kosher Butcher,” a darkly humorous commentary on Mideast politics in which he portrays a meatpacking Sweeney Todd.”


Betty Martins – I Wasn’t always Dressed Like This

29th March 2013 by michael
activism | arts | collaboration | community | documentary | education | identity | music | politics | portraiture | trailer | video



I Wasn’t always Dressed Like This [Trailer] (2013, 120MB, 1:42 min)

If the substantive piece (which I gather is about 33 minutes in length) is
anything like as good as this trailer promises it will be stunning.

This has all the hallmarks of the previous piece by Betty Martins – When the Souls Arrive – we posted here : beautifully made, scrupulously attentive to those being observed/interviewed but with its own quite particular gentle and steely authorial stamp.
(I usually hate anthropomorphising art – you know the thing, ‘this piece investigates’ &c. – except here
I am sorely tempted to say that Martin’s work ‘knows how to listen’. Of course what I mean is Martins knows how to listen, carefully and empathetically, and then to re-configure parts of that listening and looking and understanding too as moving image soaked with detail and feeling.)
In addition the subject matter could not be more timely: a broadside of delicate
beauty in the face of bigotry.


Play Local

28th March 2013 by michael
arts | collaboration | community | documentary arts | education | event | music | participatory | place | video



Play Local (2013, 69MB, 3:58 min)

Enchanting video by Tom White of a sound/music outreach project he ran in Peckham, South London on behalf, appropriately, of the South London Gallery.
There are so many piss-poor arts outreach projects. So nice to observe that this one was clearly brilliant.


Happy New Year/Everything Changes

1st January 2013 by admin
archive | arts | collaboration | community | film | network | new media art | video


gilgamesh
Gilgamesh, Part #1 (2012, 214MB, 5:03 min)

gilgamesh
Beyond Spectacle (2012, 214MB, 5:03 min)


About DVblog -

Doron started DVblog in summer 2005 and Michael started posting about a month after.
A number of people have contributed hugely along the way – notably Mica Scalin, Brittany
Shoot and Brian Gibson.
We’ve been vandalised a couple of times (hence postings now dating back only to late 2006,
although the vast majority of what was ever posted is back up now) but we’ve also had some really
delightful feedback from people who’ve felt what we’ve done is worthwhile.

Early on we decided that anything we posted would actually live on our server and this means we have assembled an extraordinary and unique archive of the birth and infancy of art video specifically created for or focussed upon the network.

One day we will donate this to an institution that will preserve it and continue to make it available for both joy and study.

When we started Quicktime was the only serious way for anyone to post moving image work to the net. Although it remains the backbone of virtually all digital moving image activity, as a mode of delivery it has now been almost completely superseded by streaming video. This has two implications – one being that the casual viewer has become less patient and is much more likely to go to YouTube or similar, where there’s no significant wait and where quality has improved immeasurably. The other is that fewer and fewer artists are posting their work in QuickTime format – so our old methodology of accepting submitted work but also scouring the net for interesting stuff is at least 50% outmoded.

Finally we want to say – it has been hard work and for no material reward. Indeed, not only have we never made a dime out of DVblog, it has cost us both cash and a great deal of time to sustain. Not that we are complaining – we hope we provided a service to people and certainly we learned a great deal and derived a great deal of pleasure from everything we posted. We made some good and lasting friendships too.

For the reasons listed above we are going to stop posting regularly from today. We finish with pieces from two artists who, in very different ways, have given us a great deal of pleasure – Annie Abrahams and Edward Picot.
Annie, with a record of a networked performance in November of 2012 and Edward with a splendidly mad take on the tale of Gilgamesh, featuring characters from his Dr Hairy series.

We’re not proposing to shut up shop entirely – we will continue post such work in QuickTime format which is submitted to us and which we like. We still think there is something special about the amount of control over quality posting an actual QT file gives and we’re very interested in continuing to write short, but we hope thoughtful and helpful, texts about these. Please, therefore, don’t be shy abuot sending us stuff!

We’d like to thank all who have contributed work over the past seven and a half years and, of course, those who have taken an interest both in the work and what we’ve had to say about it.

Finally we wish readers and contributors alike a happy, productive and thoughtful 2013.

Michael Szpakowski & Doron Golan, 1st Jan 2013.


Burroughs & Van Sant

26th December 2012 by michael
arts | community | documentary arts | film | historical | literature | observational | participatory | portraiture | video


thanksgivingprayer
Thanksgiving Prayer (1986, 7.6MB, 2:21 min.)

An astonishing rendition by William Burroughs of his
‘Thanksgiving Prayer’ in a short video directed by
Gus Van Sant.


How to Tell When a Relationship is Over (in Ninety Seconds)

19th December 2012 by doron
community | humor | movie | narrative | observational | satire


relationship1
How to Tell When a Relationship is Over (2003, 5.6MB, 1:30min.)

A micro-movie of under 90 seconds for
The Encounters Festival 2003.

Directed by Tony Roche.


Constellation – Covent Garden Winter Lights

14th December 2012 by doron
architecture | arts | community | conceptual | design | documentary arts | installation | light | new media art | serial


uva_coventgarden
Constellation (2008, 17MB, 3 min.)

“Commissioned by Covent Garden, United Visual Artists lit up the market
halls of Covent Garden with a responsive light installation. Launched as
the flagship piece of the winter season program at Covent Garden the
installation featured 600 custom-designed mirrored LED tubes hanging
above the entire Covent Garden market space.

The volumetric arrangement of the tubes created a canvas in which three
dimensional light formations were made possible. Constellation was also
individually controllable using a custom-designed control panel, giving the
installation an intimate connection with the public.”

United Visual Artists are a British-based collective whose current practice spans permanent architectural installation, live performance and responsive installation.


Locusts

6th December 2012 by brittany
activism | arts | community | documentary | documentary arts | education | historical | music video | narrative | politics | video



Emergence – Locusts (2008, 233.8MB, 11:19)

From celebrated MC Invincible, a docu-music-video
about the history of gentrification and capitalism’s
destruction of communities in Detroit.
Video features several local activists, including
Grace Lee Boggs and (full disclosure) my good friend
Ron Scott.
This intense collaboration gives me chills every
time I watch it.
I’ll let the rest speak for itself.